Monday, July 28, 2014

Words to Grow By - Isaiah Rhodes (2014)






 July 15/2014
  http://www.amazon.com/Free-Style-Maximize-Performance-Movements/dp/1628600209
Foreword by Kelly Starrett

After over 15 years of training as an elite gymnast and over a decade of coaching, Coach Carl Paoli offers a fresh philosophy on training by connecting movement styles to fit your specific purpose, while also giving you a simple framework for mastering the basics of any human movement. Freestyle: Maximize Your Sport and Life Performance with Four Basic Movements is an interactive way to learn how the body is designed to move through space and how to interact with our constantly changing surroundings. Using this framework and four basic movements, Paoli will help you maximize your efforts in sport and life, regardless of specialty. Despite Carl's experience as an elite gymnast and a renowned CrossFit coach, this is not a book about gymnastics, CrossFit, or any specific fitness program. Rather, it is a unique take on how Carl studies and teaches human movement and how you can better understand how to move yourself. Carl is not going to teach you the specifics of a movement or sport; instead, he gives you a template that you can use to develop any specific movement. For example, instead of teaching you how to throw a baseball, this book teaches you a universal foundation that will help you further develop your pitching skills. Human movement is intuitive, but not always perfect. This book shows you how to: * Turn on and trust your intuition about movement * Use tools that help optimize imperfect movement * Tap into the universal movement patterns and progressions underlying all disciplines * Use Carl Paoli's movement framework to create roadmaps for your physical success * Learn what being strong really means Freestyle is a practical manual to develop human movement regardless of your discipline. It is equally applicable to veteran athletes, weekend warriors, fitness enthusiasts, people trying to pick up a new sport, and people who are simply curious about improving their health. By developing your awareness and learning to see across other disciplines, you can tailor any training regimen to meet your unique goals.

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THREE WEIDER PRINCIPLES

 
When you're intent on getting fit, you're willing to do just about anything for a little more muscle and a little less bodyfat. Low-carb days, ultra-high-rep sessions, extra work on the treadmill, a few early-morning workouts or even the paid assistance of a trainer or nutritionist - whatever it takes, right? But in the rush to put the latest hardcore craze to work for us, we lose sight of the fact that the simplest solution can often be the correct one.

For decades, some of the world's most amazing physiques have been built through strict adherence to an authoritative set of guidelines known as the Weider Principles. Named after the late father of modern bodybuilding, Joe Weider (1919-2013), these 'rules' - a list more than 20 deep - formed the basis for nearly every approach to bodybuilding in practice today. Just about every one of them has been affirmed in some fashion by research, even if references to the original guiding principles were artfully omitted.

Developed through years of firsthand experience and anecdotal evidence from those under his tutelage, Joe Weider's principles remain the true-north training indicator for muscle-seeking athletes everywhere. In the pages that follow, we continue our examination of these principles with a few tidbits on how to put them into practice today.


Weider Principle: Negatives

Nearly every lifter in gym-dom is concerned with their bench stats. How much do you bench, bro? To so many, this effort to overcome gravity far too often usurps what follows: the power to resist it.

Generating as much force as possible to move the weight concentrically (the positive) has its benefits. This helps recruit far more growth-prone fast-twitch muscle fibers for the task at hand. But remember: To grow, a muscle must first be broken down, and that process is maximized through a slow, controlled negative rep.

Researchers estimate that some athletes can handle up to 160% of their one-rep max on the negative portion of a rep. That is to say that if you can positively bench 200 lbs, you can likely perform at least one negative-only rep with 320 lbs of iron. A more common approach calls for using a weight that is around 124 to 140% of your 1RM for 3 to 5 reps. And being able to fight the good fight against gravity with that type of weight holds significant benefits, including amped-up protein synthesis and higher levels of muscle-building hormones like insulin-like growth factor-1.

In addition to going slower on the negative portion of all your reps in the gym, you can secure additional benefits by performing dedicated, heavy eccentric work. One option for those who train muscle groups once per week is to try mixing in 3 to 5 sets of 3 to 5 negative reps - taking 5 to 6 seconds on each rep - on your main mass-builder and after your traditional-rep sets work. These sets should only be done with the help of a strong and attentive spotter or two. Because negative work is more demanding, take 2 to 4 minutes of rest between sets to allow for better recovery.

Sample Negative Chest Workout

1) Incline Bench Press - 4 x 6-8 reps.
On your last set, after reaching initial failure, have a reliable spotter help you through 2 or 3 slow negatives with your working weight. Rest 2 to 4 minutes before starting the next exercise.

2) Bench Press - 4 x 6-8.
Same as above.

3) Bench Press - 3-5 sets of 3-5 reps.
Load the bar with 120-140% of your 1RM and have a reliable spotter or two help you through 3 to 5 slow negatives - about 5 to 6 seconds each. On each rep, have your spotter(s) power the bar through the positive so that you can focus on the negative. Rest 2 to 4 minutes between sets. 

4) Dumbbell Flye - 3 x 15.

Negative training without a training partner (Nick Nilsson):

Arthur Jones articles on negative and negative accentuated training:
http://www.arthurjonesexercise.com/Athletic/NegAccentuate.PDF

Arthur Jones online library:




Weider Principle: Pyramid Training

Joe Weider knew then what we dedicated lifters still have a hard time believing: A warmed-up muscle performs better than a cold one. But out of this simple belief, the concept of pyramid training was born. The concept of increasing weight from set to set was thought to be more effective because the muscles were gradually acclimated to heavier weight with each passing set - you were essentially 'gearing up' for the most demanding set. Science later backed this up in the DeLorme study, which found that subjects who increased the weight by a certain percentage each set - 50, 75 and 100% of 10 rep maximum, respectively - while aiming for 10 reps, gained a significant amount of strength. 

   


Sample DeLorme (pyramid) Method Routine for Back:

1) Bentover Barbell Row: 3 sets of 8-10 reps.
On your first set use 50% of your 10-rep max.
On your second set use 75% of your 10-rep max.
On your third set perform as many reps as possible using your 10-rep max.
Rest one to two minutes between sets.

2) Wide-Grip Lat Pulldown: 3 x 8-10
Same as above.

3) Seated Cable Row: 3 x 8-10
Same as above.

4) Underhand Pulldown: 3 x 8-10
Same as above.

5) Straight-Arm Lat Pulldown: 3 x 12-15
Regular reps.


The DeLorme Method is considered 'traditional' pyramid training, but another study out of Oxford University in England turned the pyramid on its head and produced similar results.

In the Oxford study, after a thorough warmup, subjects performed their heaviest weight first (100% of 10-rep max) and then reduced the weight each set to reach failure at 10 reps. Hence, the Oxford method is now referred to as the 'reverse' pyramid.

2009 research paper -
Comparison of DeLorme with Oxford resistance training techniques:
Effects of training on muscle damage markers - 
http://goo.gl/xSHwqG 



Head-to-head, subjects in these groups gained a similar amount of strength, but the Delorme group came away slightly stronger. The DeLorme method is considered the best for strength, while the Oxford protocol may have he edge in helping lifters add size because it calls for them to reach failure more than once. Also, with the Oxford method, the opening max effort is optimized because you aren't fatigued from other working sets.


Sample Oxford (reverse pyramid) Method Routine for Back:

1) Bentover Barbell Row: 3 sets of 10 reps.
On your first set (after warmups) use 100% of your 10-rep max.
On your second and third sets reduce the weight just enough to reach 10 reps before failing.
Rest one to two minutes between sets.   


Whether you choose traditional or reverse pyramids, you're going to see good gains in size and strength. The DeLorme method can help you gain strength faster, which translates to more reps with more weight on everything else. The Oxford method of pyramid training may help you gain more size because of the increased intensity factor of failing on multiple sets. Either approach is a welcome departure from straight-set training, in which you use the same weight for the same number of reps from set to set.



Weider Principle: Cheating

Yes, we know that cheaters never prosper, but Weider saw the struggle with the weights differently. He saw each set as a fight to be won and thought that sometimes, if you're not cheating, you're just not trying hard enough.

Weider posited that a few calculated 'cheats' in form - using a little body English to get through a sticking point - wasn't all that bad for you. Moving the weight is better than not moving it, right? The answer is yes . . . and no.

When Weider first started vocalizing the benefits of cheating, he was referring to more experienced athletes - those who knew the difference between a productive set and one that is more likely to see you end up in a back brace than on the winner's podium. The most familiar version of cheating is probably the least productive one - the ambitious barbell curler who has loaded up with more than he can handle and must swing his way through every sloppy rep of his prescribed set. This, as Weider would tell you, is not the way to benefit from a little deviation. 

To cheat properly you must first be able to complete picture-perfect reps of a given exercise, even if this means sacrificing weight initially. Then, after some time - this is definitely not a technique for newbies - you can run through a set to failure, using some calculated momentum to 'cheat' your way through a few additional reps. Because going beyond failure is critical to gaining strength or size- or burning fat - cheating can actually benefit you.

Incorporating two to three cheat reps to get through sticking points at the end of a well executed set can help you break down more muscle and come back stronger next time. But you should only use this principle sparingly - the bulk of your reps should be clean - and beginners shouldn't use cheat reps at all. Abusing this principle can have disastrous consequences. Curling with too much sway or cheating for too man reps can injure your shoulders and/or back, meaning you won't be training those biceps for some time, either.


Sample Cheating Method Biceps Routine:

1) Barbell Curl - 3 x 10-12.
Select a weight that allows you to complete 10 to 12 clean repetitions. On your final set, after reaching initial positive failure, use a little momentum in the form of a small hip thrust to 'cheat' through two or three more reps.

2) Alternating Dumbbell Curl - 3 x 10-12.
Same as above.

3) Hammer Curl - 3 x 10-12.
Same as above.

4) Reverse Curl - 3 x 12-15.
Regular reps.     
 










After over 15 years of training as an elite gymnast and over a decade of coaching, Coach Carl Paoli offers a fresh philosophy on training by connecting movement styles to fit your specific purpose, while also giving you a simple framework for mastering the basics of any human movement. Freestyle: Maximize Your Sport and Life Performance with Four Basic Movements is an interactive way to learn how the body is designed to move through space and how to interact with our constantly changing surroundings. Using this framework and four basic movements, Paoli will help you maximize your efforts in sport and life, regardless of specialty. Despite Carl's experience as an elite gymnast and a renowned CrossFit coach, this is not a book about gymnastics, CrossFit, or any specific fitness program. Rather, it is a unique take on how Carl studies and teaches human movement and how you can better understand how to move yourself. Carl is not going to teach you the specifics of a movement or sport; instead, he gives you a template that you can use to develop any specific movement. For example, instead of teaching you how to throw a baseball, this book teaches you a universal foundation that will help you further develop your pitching skills. Human movement is intuitive, but not always perfect. This book shows you how to: * Turn on and trust your intuition about movement * Use tools that help optimize imperfect movement * Tap into the universal movement patterns and progressions underlying all disciplines * Use Carl Paoli's movement framework to create roadmaps for your physical success * Learn what being strong really means Freestyle is a practical manual to develop human movement regardless of your discipline. It is equally applicable to veteran athletes, weekend warriors, fitness enthusiasts, people trying to pick up a new sport, and people who are simply curious about improving their health. By developing your awareness and learning to see across other disciplines, you can tailor any training regimen to meet your unique goals. - See more at: http://books.simonandschuster.ca/Free+Style/Carl-Paoli/9781628600209#sthash.XkDzjQrR.dpuf

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